White Hall

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I’m very excited to be participating in the Historic Ellicott City 2017 Decorator Show House, White Hall. This will be my 6th house with HEC, and I’ll be designing the Gathering Room.  Stay tuned for more details; in the meantime, here’s some history about this gorgeous property from the HEC website:

White Hall is a sterling example of the Federal style of 19th Century Maryland.  The mansion resides on the National Register of Historic Places signifying its historic importance to the local region.  It is currently the home of Annamarie and William Hugel.  Built sometime prior to 1810, the house was originally occupied by Col. Charles Worthington Dorsey and remained in the hands of Dorsey descendants until its current owners purchased the property in 1997.  Col. Dorsey, born in 1787, fought in the war of 1812, was a prominent landowner and planter, and was also active in politics and served as a Howard County Commissioner.  Of note, Colonel Dorsey’s daughter, Mary Tolley Dorsey married Thomas Ligon, who served in several political positions reaching the pinnacle of his political career when serving as Governor of Maryland from 1854 through 1857.  The Ligon’s lived at White Hall upon his retirement.

In the 1890’s, White Hall was struck by lightning and was partially destroyed by fire.  While some of the outside walls and chimneys, built of stone and brick covered with stucco, survived, the central section was completely destroyed and the west wing was severely damaged.  The east wing, which did not have connecting passageways, was undamaged.  In 1901, Governor Ligon’s son, Charles Worthington Dorsey Ligon, commenced the reconstruction of White Hall. The reconstruction used the undamaged gable ends and foundation of the original house and was crafted in the same detail as the original White Hall.  The west wing was internally redesigned to include the kitchen which had been separately housed prior to the fire.  In addition, the central section was made to be two rooms deep instead of the original one room on each of the first two floors. Two major cosmetic additions in 1901 were the grand Palladian window – on the second floor – originally for a small nursery or sewing room, and now a luxurious bathroom and the front porch with its 6 Doric columns and a balustrade.  In 1965, the screen porch at the end of the West Wing was added, the original granite steps that had led into the kitchen were moved to become the porch steps.

White Hall originally consisted of parts of the early land grants of Dorsey’s Search and Freeborn’s Progress in Howard County.  Currently situated on over 5 acres of land, White Hall tops a Hill and majestically overlooks the estate’s own pond.  The property is lushly forested and one can frequently see a herd of deer grazing lazily in the front yard.

In addition to the main house, there are three outbuildings dating back to the early 1800’s.  These three consist of a small square frame workshop on fieldstone foundations, a smokehouse-privy built with squared-off stones with brick arches over the doors and lastly a smokehouse of fieldstone.

White Hall is located at 4130 Chatham Road, Ellicott City, MD 21042 (Chatham Road is off of Frederick Road, it is not N. Chatham Road.  Please check your GPS for directions)

The Show House will be open to the public from September 24, 2017 to October 22, 2017.

Come and see us this Friday, March 3rd from 6:00 – 9:00!

It’s First Friday and sure to be a lucky night on Sykesville’s Main Street! Pick up a card a the Main Street tent. Then find the Leprechaun in every participating store and get your card punched. Completed punch cards will be entered in a raffle to win a Main Street gift basket – includes a $50 gift certificate from Woodside Home!

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The finishing touch…

Window treatments are much more than an afterthought. They add a sense of coziness, dampen sound, increase energy efficiency, create visual interest, and tie the elements of a room together. With our wide variety of fabrics, trimmings, and drapery hardware we’d love to design and fabricate the finishing touches for your windows. Let Woodside Home furnish your room, and you may save enough to add window treatments!

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Gorgeous!

This 106″ tufted sofa with down blend cushions and nail head trim is featured in the RH catalog priced at $4495 – $6695, plus delivery. You can order it at Woodside Home for $1599 – $2499, delivered. Smaller sofas and chair are available. It’s as comfortable as it is beautiful!

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Isn’t slipcovered furniture great?

Slip covered furniture is wonderful in so many ways. Slip covers are easy to maintain and so versatile. Crisp white canvas for summer and plush red velvet for the holidays!

You can order great slip covered furniture from those beautiful catalogs that come in the mail and that cool furniture store at the mall. But why do that when you can order from Woodside Home?  We have more fabric, size, and cushion options; along with personal service and fantastic prices.  This slip covered sofa with down blend cushions is sold by those retailers for $1699 – $ 2899 – delivery is additional. Our price, delivered, ranges from $1199 – $1799.

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Coming soon!

It’s so exciting to create Woodside Home in the storefront at 7541 Main Street in Sykesville.  Flooring is being replaced, paint colors chosen and merchandise ordered.  Looking forward to opening our doors in November 2016.  In the meantime check out the “About” page and watch for posts about the history of our building and, of course, furniture!

Thanks, Mom.

It’s been awhile since I posted on this blog. Life has pulled me away from work the past few years.  My mom had been spending months at a time at our house for years but had pretty much come to stay full time in 2011.  Together we created her own private space but she was very much a part of our home.  She’d suffered from lung disease for several years and though she kept on ticking she was declining, frequently very ill.  I’m so fortunate that I was able to pull back from work, just taking referrals that came my way, and be present for my mom and daughter.  I’m so glad she was part of our lives.  She passed away last July.  It was tough to lose her slowly these past years and only now, a year later, do I feel I’m beginning to get my bearings.  We miss her.

I’ve been trying to sit down and write a post for months but everything seemed so forced and false.  It dawned on me that all I needed to do was to tip my hat to Mom and then say, “I’m back, excited and ready to help you with your home!”  So here goes…

My mom, Frances Willa Thorson Davidson, was all around wonderful. She was a talented artist in many mediums, a fantastic seamstress, a can do painter, carpenter, gardener, cook and always spoke her mind.  Later in life she had her own antique shop.  Her eye for design was brilliant.  Growing up there was always a project happening, our house was filled with art and art books.  As a military family we moved often but we always had a garden and flowers, window treatments and paint.  Mom and I were great museum pals, she would often fly out from Washington state just to see an exhibit she’d read about in Smithsonian Magazine.  She loved her family and she loved people and had a great sense of humor.  My daughter is so much like her it’s scary, in a good way.  Her way of life was artful – her home, her dinner parties, her garden, her clothing and costume jewelry.  Because of her I’m a gardener, a seamstress, a student of art, an estate sale fiend and am able to make a living doing something I love – helping people create beautiful, comfortable homes.  Thanks, Mom.

I hope you’ll share my page with family and friends and get in touch about any design projects you have in the works.  I look forward to it.  Here’s a smattering of Mom’s work, enjoy!

 

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Nadia Janjua

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I was so glad when Nadia Janjua agreed to do a painting of the Patapsco Female Institute ruins for my space in Mount Ida.  As this years Historic Ellicott City Decorator Show House comes to a close I’d like to feature her.

Nadia Janjua is an emerging Artist, practicing Architect, and an Art Educator based in the Washington, D.C. area. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the George Washington University (Washington, D.C.) in 2000, and her Master of Architecture degree from the New Jersey Institute of Technology (Newark, NJ) in 2005. Nadia’s passion to beautify the world with her hands, combined with her fascination of design and technology led her to startup an art and design-based business in 2011, called Nadia J Art.

Nadia has been exhibiting her work professionally throughout the United States over the past ten years, and more recently, internationally. She has had numerous works commissioned by private collectors and contributes her art annually to charity events.

Her art work is inspired by her deeply spiritual and emotional connection to her faith, as well as the experiences of her life’s journey. Ever since she can remember, Nadia has been reflective of the human experience — from its chaos and despair, to its magnificence and beauty. It is this search for insight and understanding of any moment or event that has led to an infinite source of inspiration for her creative works.

 

Brian Laurich

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In keeping with the theme of my “Local Office” space at Mount Ida, this year’s Historic Ellicott City Decorator Show House, I’ve tried to source items locally and made in America.  The braided rug was handmade by the Stroud family in Virginia.  The bright yellow wing chairs were made in North Carolina and covered in fabric made in the USA.  Both original artworks were created by artists with Maryland connections.  Today I’d like to write about Brian Laurich who painted the gorgeous Maryland flag on wood that hangs over the fireplace.

Brian was introduced to art by his father Len, a graphic artist and accomplished watercolor painter.  He grew up in Greensburg, Pa., and graduated from Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with an emphasis in painting and drawing. College classes first exposed himto the work of Richard Diebenkorn and Jim Dine, whose influences, along with Andrew Wyeth, became important in Brian’s approach to art.  Pursuing a career in fine art, however, took a back seat to raising a family. Brian and his wife of 25 years, Christine, have two daughters, Amalie and Hannah.  He worked in the graphic arts field for 15 years, where he learned computer applications for design and composition, which became pivotal in future work. During this time, he  began creating signs on antique wood, making the lettering and graphics reflect the age of the wood.  This idea came from a desire to use the existing character of the original, antique, painted surface as a canvas. Brian left the graphic arts world to work on vintage art full time in 2004.  He has since created unique, authentic pieces for corporations such as Polo Ralph Lauren, NBC Universal, The History Channel, and Reebok. His work can also be found in historical landmarks, restaurants and homes across the United States and the United Kingdom.  In 2006, Brian was chosen to be a member of the Country Living Magazine Artists Guild.  He as recently returned to his roots in fine art painting. They reflect the culmination of his schooling, graphic art experience, and appreciation of period design. You’ll find Brian’s work showcased most recently in several fine art galleries in Pennsylvania.  Be sure to check out his website http://www.vintagesigns.com/

Before

 

 

Historic Ellicott City, Inc. and Friends of the Patapsco Female Institute have moved their offices out of Mount Ida.  The work needed to restore this beautiful old home has begun.  My design work on the “Local Office” space is humming along – window treatments are being made, furniture has been ordered and art is being created.  Here are a few “before” photos, I’ll share more as my space transforms.  I hope you’ll all mark your calendars to attend this show house, it’s going to be a good one!  The show runs September 28th through October 27th.

 

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